The Quadrant of Happiness To-Do List Matrix

It’s a new year. New resolutions. New plans. New ways to get everything done. I’ve tried every to-do list, prioritization plan, productivity model, and 4-hour workweek on the planet. And whiel some work better than others, I’m still searching for the perfect method. To do lists are a personalized phenomenon – what works best for a Sagittarius will never work for a Taurus. So I’m sharing my new model – a self-designed, structured but flexible layout for optimizing your time and energy. I call it the Quadrants of Happiness. If you share any of my tendencies, feel free to use it. Overall theory: To-do lists are designed to make you do… Read More

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Ask a Performance Psychologist

A few months ago, I mentioned that my sister, Dr. Elizabeth Boyer, had launched Northwest Performance Psychology. As you may imagine, the two of us tend to have a lot of spirited discussions about the differences between the theories of performance psychology and how they apply in high-pressure workplaces such as technology companies. Well we’ve decided to expand the conversation. We’re going to start a little series where we look at topics relevant to high performing professionals, and have a little Q+A. I’ll ask most of the questions, but we also want to open it up to others. So if you have questions about peak performance, business coaching, competitive environments or… Read More

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What is Performance Psychology?

Russel Wilson has one on staff. Most college and pro teams have several. But what does a Performance Psychologist actually do? Elizabeth Boyer, PhD, describes it this way: Develop strategies to build consistency and satisfaction in sport and life Identify solutions for challenges and concerns. Get support to successfully navigate set backs, injuries, and transitions. You can learn more about this field by checking out her site, Northwest Performance Psychology.  

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“I Have Front Row Seats to Kobe’s Last Game And…”

Well, I didn’t have seats to Kobe’s last game, in the front row, right next to the Lakers bench. But this woman in the photo below did. What would you do with such a prime location for such a milestone game? I’d probably do one or more of the following: Watch intently Take photos Take video During commercial breaks, post to a social channel or 12. Now let’s see what this lucky person was doing. By all means, blow up the photo for a better view. What could should be doing? What’s your guess? Checking Facebook Calling an Uber so she can get out before the crowd Texting her friends… Read More

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Guest Post – The Referee’s Perspective: Sometimes We Know What We Are Doing

Editor’s Note: Garrett Galbreath is a high school basketball official in Washington State and a Board Member for the Snohomish County Basketball Officials. Since I am someone who has ALWAYS treated sports officials with the greatest of respect, and NEVER engaged in any kinds of disagreement with one rearding the idiocy of their calls, laziness on the field, or out and out incompetence, I wanted to get an opinion from his side of the whistle. Why do some parents, coaches, and players insist on arguing with these highly trained and well-meaning people, simply for screwing up a call on the field? This is the 1st post in the series of,… Read More

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One Human, One Block, One Year: An Idea for Solving Homelessness

So file this under pie in the sky, hopeless ideas that have no chance of coming true. Unless, that is, one person tries to get it going. NPR published an interesting article the other day about Homelessness in Seattle. One stat stood out: “According to the latest count, in January, more than 3,700 people live on the streets of King County. The number of people sleeping outside shot up by 20 percent in just the past year.” 3,700. That number sounds enormous when you are thinking about how a government agency could fix the problem. And the government has proven it can’t do it. Here’s another stat from the article,… Read More

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Bridging the Social Media Ocean

When I chose to go back to Grad School at the UW  in 2004, I made a conscious decision that after I graduated, I would say “Yes” to every opportunity to learn more that would ever be thrown at me. In the first few years, saying “Yes” meant speaking at the Undergraduate Marketing Club or Young Entrepreneurs Club, or meeting with VCIC students. That evolved into judging the UW Business Plan Competition, taking on interns for projects and guest lecturing from time to time. Before I knew it, I was teaching  real classes, trying to implement the parts of business school I benefited from the most as a student, while… Read More

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Tossing 15 Things a Day

My friend Liz told me that she has a pact with herself. She throws away 15 things a day. It could be 15 pieces of paper, 15 paper clips or 5 shirts and 10 paper towels. It doesn’t matter. 15 things go into the trash (or charity bin). She said it’s not that hard to do, and less painful than a whole day of spring cleaning. By the end of the week, she’s tossed 105 things. By the end of the month, 450. By the end of the year, 5400. Maybe I can’t do 15, maybe I can only start with 10. But I am going to start to do… Read More

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The Power of “Yes”

  I could have you click over to Seth Godin’s blog, which I strongly suggest you add to your list of daily reads. (You can even have it delivered via email, it’s that easy…) But in case you are just browsing through and don’t want to click a link, here’s some wise words for the day. On behalf of yes Yes, it’s okay to ship your work. Yes, you’re capable of making a difference. Yes, it’s important. Yes, you can ignore that critic. Yes, your bravery is worth it. Yes, we believe in you. Yes, you can do even better. Yes. Yes is an opportunity and yes is an obligation.… Read More

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